Research at Seeds of Education

We work evidence-based and base our decisions on primary or secondary data.

Auf dieser Seite finden Sie Auszüge aus der zugrundeliegenden Literature Review für die Inter­vention sowie Themen, die wir in Zukunft unter­suchen wollen.

Libraries and their global significance

On this page you will find excerpts from the Literature Review, which forms the theoretical foundation for our intervention. 

Table of contents: 

Global situation and outlook

Dynamic and stimulating literacy environments are essential for the acquisition, development and lifelong use of literacy skills. In regions where there is a severe lack of access to reading materials, such lifelong use as well as a vibrant reading culture in the cross-section of society can hardly be achieved without remedying it (see Krolak 2005: 3). 

As a particularly young continent with the largest proportion of young people in the average demographic, Africa has experienced high but not entirely inclusive economic growth in the last decade. The continent still struggles with the highest illiteracy rate as well as high unemployment, especially among youth (see Mojapelo 2018: 2). Illiteracy and insufficient access to free education are by no means an African problem, however, but can be observed globally, especially in economically weaker regions. 

The digital divide also plays a role: girls and women in economically weaker regions usually do not have equal access to information and communication technology, nor to training or educational opportunities focused on it. Public libraries can provide both access and the necessary training (cf. IFLA: 2015). 

Globally, there are still great differences in levels of analphabetisation, free access to information and communication technology, and stimulating and dynamic reading and writing environments. Libraries as a well-known concept are a promising way to overcome these differences in free access to knowledge and education.

The library as a companion to school education

Quality education is therefore essential to enable broad knowledge within a population. Educational resources are crucial for improving the level of education in schools (see Mojapelo 2017: 3). Libraries provide their users with access to reading materials, as well as literacy programmes, which in the long run improve students’ academic performance. In addition, non-formal education activities such as events and competitions are promoted (see Dent & Yannotta 2005, in Omona 2020: 7).

In its framework for achieving SDG 4, UNESCO calls for ensuring access to free and sustainable education for children and young people, as well as access to safe places for such education acquisition (see UNESCO 2015: 35-51). 

Just as literacy needs a functional framework, newly acquired literacy skills need to be continuously used and improved to ensure lasting literacy. While various areas play a role in this, such as the school situation and the home environment, libraries can also have an influence (see Krolak 2005: 2; cf. Singh 2003: viii), for example by encouraging reading (see Omona 2020: 7). Children who grow up in a literate home environment have an advantage when they start school and are more likely to be successful throughout their formal schooling than their peers from a non- or semi-literate home environment (cf. Stiftung Lesen 2004: 30).

The desire to support their own children’s acquisition of written language is a strong motivation for illiterate adults to learn to read and write themselves. This group can be specifically reached by libraries through family literacy programmes, which consequently benefit both parents and children (see Krolak 2005: 4f.). 

Especially through cooperation with local schools on activities and resources, well-equipped, functional community libraries can play a central role in promoting good education (see Mojapelo 2018: 12). Education on basic rights can also take place in libraries to address gender inequalities. With innovative and well-designed programmes, community libraries can support girls in particular to inspire/sensitise them for politics, business and leadership positions (see Mojapelo 2018: 13).

Libraries are a possible factor in the consolidation of school education. By also being able to engage parents and community members in general in educational activities (workshops, etc.), they can also help influence other crucial factors such as the approach to education in the home environment. They can also promote equality through targeted initiatives.

Positive influence of extracurricular reading

Studies show the positive impact of additional access to books and reading materials: 

A study by the READ Educational Trust in South Africa, compared children in classes with class libraries with a control group without libraries. Children with class libraries performed up to 189 per cent better than the pupils in the control school and were 18 months ahead in reading achievement and two years ahead in writing achievement (cf. Montagnes 2001: 28).

So-called “book floods” also show enormous improvements in reading, writing, listening, vocabulary and grammar (cf. Krolak 2005: 6).

Early access to books promotes education, as the programme “Bookstart” in Great Britain found out – the transfer of the result to places with a lower density of offers for the free acquisition of information, such as sub-Saharan Africa, gives hope for comparable results (cf. Makotsi 2004: 5).

Various approaches show that out-of-school access to reading materials positively influences a child’s individual education. Libraries, as collections of reading materials freely available to all levels of society, can use this insight to provide children and young people with a better education and to awaken interest in reading, writing and literature.

 

Socio-economic significance of the library

In order to contribute to sustainable change, individuals need skills, values and attitudes that enable them to do so. Education is therefore crucial to achieving sustainable development.

According to Abata-Ebire (2018) and Bradley (2016), libraries provide essential support to work towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by providing access to information and information technology and helping people develop the capacity to use information effectively and preserve it to ensure continued access for future generations.

Effective library and information services promote socio-economic development by fostering a knowledge society and enabling people, especially marginalised people and those living in poverty, to exercise their rights, be economically active, learn new skills, enrich cultural identity and participate in decision-making (see IFLA 2013, after Omona 2020: 2).

Libraries can be important places for information and knowledge exchange in countries of the Global South, especially in marginalised groups where people grow up with little or no formal education, are affected by gender inequalities and are at risk of extreme poverty. 

Libraries provide a neutral space where women can safely gather and learn independently or collectively in areas that are relevant and of interest to them in order to improve their competencies and skills to achieve gender equality and women’s empowerment (see Jones 2009: 126 in Omona 2020: 12).

Numerous researchers have focused on promoting the personal and social development of citizens in the context of publicly accessible libraries. As access to information is a human right, the importance of libraries cannot be overstated. The creation of such places serves this human right and promotes equal access regardless of socio-economic background, gender or faith (see The IFLA/UNESCO xPublic Library Manifesto 1994; see Salman et al. 2017; see South African Bill of Rights 2011; see Fourie & Meyer 2016; see Jain & Nfila 2011; see Stilwell 2016).

Structural disadvantage and extreme poverty have a major impact on the quality of learning that is provided. Access to information is an essential component of socio-economic development. Mojapelo therefore recommends that public libraries need to change and rethink their roles, resources and services. These need to be adapted, reconfigured and expanded to achieve the SDGs in which they provide information and good access to users (see Mojapelo 2018: 14).

Libraries are safe, welcoming places at the heart of communities. Equipped with a welcoming team that understands local needs, they are able to foster and provide innovation, creativity and access to the world’s knowledge for current and future generations (see IFLA: 2018).

Known sources of error in international library construction

Lor, who has deeply studied concepts and methods of international librarianship (see 2015; see 2019), suggests that of the many ways to navigate new ones, one should pay particular attention to failed attempts, as these can be more informative than those that succeeded (see Lor 2015: 531). The following is an excerpt from our research on known sources of failure: 

A non-localised library system: The Anglo-American model of the library is widespread and shapes the education of many librarians across the planet. However, the resulting export of a library system tailored to Western readers is worthy of criticism, especially from a postcolonial perspective, according to Krolak (see Krolak 2005: 11). Instead, the author recommends a locally-individualised variant – just as Seeds of Education strives for through its quality as a learning organisation.

 

Different and extreme weather conditions: As books, computers and audio-visual materials are very sensitive, they need to be protected from extreme weather conditions. Our project plan takes these aspects into account so that rain and humidity or sun and heat are not obstacles (cf. ibid).

 

These and other known sources of error are incorporated into our approach. As a learning organisation, we constantly grow from the feedback of all stakeholders and our users and also learn from our own mistakes.

Libraries and access to information

Information can contribute greatly to social and democratic development, cultural enrichment, education and research, micro- and macroeconomic development (see Mojapelo 2018: 2).

Access to information supports development by empowering people, especially marginalised groups and people living in poverty, to exercise their rights, be economically active, learn new skills, enrich their cultural identity and participate in decision-making processes (see Mojapelo 2018: 7).

The quality of education offered can only be improved by providing adequate inputs in the form of adequate educational resources, qualified teaching staff and modern facilities (see Mojapelo 2018: 11).

Without adequate inputs in the form of adequate educational resources, qualified and competent teachers and modern facilities, it remains a dream for many (rural) schools to improve the quality of education offered (see Mojapelo 2018: 11).

Furthermore, information is needed for empowerment and decision-making and is necessary for development in rural communities (see Unagha & Ibenne, 2011). Especially in rural areas, there is a great need for information services that adequately serve citizens (see Omona 2020: 4).

Equal access to information is essential to empower participation in a democratic global community (see Krolak 2005: 7). Libraries unfold the learning potential of a community by making it available.

Especially in a globalised world, access to information is essential. Libraries enjoy a very high status within societies and provide people with important news and high-quality content. 

Bibliography

Abu, R.; Grace M.; Carroll M. (2011): The role of the rural public library in community development and empowerment. International Journal of the Book 8(2). Available at: https://codeethiopiadigitalbooks.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/rolecommunitylibrary.pdf accessed 2021-01-12).

Cyr, C;  Connaway, LS. (2020): Libraries and the UN Sustainable Development Goals: The past, present, and future. Proc Assoc Inf Sci Technol. 57:e237. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1002/pra2.237 (accessed 2021-01-24).

Dent, V.F. (2006): Modelling the rural community library: Characteristics of the Kitengesa Library in rural Uganda. New Library World 107(1220/1221): 16–30.

IFLA (2012): Empowering Women and Girls through ICT at Libraries Issue Brief, October 2012. The Hague: Beyond Access.

Jones, S. (2009): The community library as site of education and empowerment for women. Insights from rural Uganda. Libri, 59(2), 124-133.

Krolak, L. (2005): The role of libraries in the creation of literate environments. Background paper prepared for the Education For All Global Maintaining Report 2006 Literacy for Life. UNESCO Institute for Education, Hamburg, Germany.

Lor, P. J. (2015): Understanding innovation and policy transfer: implications for Libraries and Information Services in Africa. Library Trends, 64(1), 84-111.

Lor, P. J. (2019): International and comparative librarianship: concepts and methods for global studies. Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG.

Mchombu, K. & Cadbury, N. (2006): Libraries, literacy and poverty reduction: A key to African development. Available at: http://eprints.rclis.org/10167/1/2006.MchombuK%26CadburyN.LibrariesPoverty.pdf (accessed 2021-02-03).

McKee, B. (n.d.): The role of the library in promoting peace. Available at: http://www.un.org/depts/dhl/dag/symposium_docs/mckee.pdf (accessed 2021-01-30).

Mansour, E. (2019): Libraries as agents for development: The potential role of Egyptian rural public libraries towards the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals based on the UN 2030 Agenda. Available at: 
https://doi.org/10.1177/0961000619872064 (accessed 2021-01-14).

Montagnes, I. (2001): .Education for All 2000 Assessment, Thematic Studies: Textbooks and Learning Materials 1990-99 UNESCO, ADEA: 27. 

Omona, W. (2020): The roles of library and information services in achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Uganda. Library Philosophy and Practice, 1-19.

Poon, L. (2019): Should Libraries be Guardians of their Cities’ Public Data? CityLab. https://www.citylab.com/life/2019/02/libraries-public-information-city-data-digital-archive/581905/ (accessed 2020-12-12).

Scarf, P. (2016): Free, online and in your public library: delivering legal information to the community. Presented at the 2016 World Library and Information Congress, Columbus, United States. http://library.ifla.org/1373/1/179-scarf-en.pdf  (accessed 2020-12-06).

Scherer, J.A. (2014): Green libraries promoting sustainable communities. In: WLIC 2014 at Session 152: Environmental Sustainability and Libraries Special Interest Group, Lyon, France, 16–22 August 2014. IFLA. Available at:
http://library.ifla.org/939/1/152-scherer-en.pdf 
(accessed 2021-02-02).

Singh, S. (2003): Library and literacy movement for national development. New Delhi, Concept Publishing. xxvi, 286 p. Bibl.: pp. 269-280.

Stranger-Johannessen, E.; Asselin, M.; Doiron, R. (2015): New perspectives on community library development in Africa”, New Library World, Vol. 116 Iss 1/2 pp. 79 – 93. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/NLW-05-2014-0063 (accessed 2021-02-03).

United Nations (2015): Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform. Available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300 (accessed 2021-02-01).

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (2016): Education for people & planet: Creating sustainable futures for all. Paris: UNESCO. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000250392 (accessed 2020-12-03).

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (2017): Reducing global poverty through universal primary and secondary education. Policy Paper 32/Fact Sheet 44. Paris: UNESCO. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000250392  (accessed 2020-12-03).

United Nations (2017): Sustainable Development Goals: 17 Goals to transform our world. Available at: http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment (accessed 2021-01-15).

Web Foundation (2016): Women’s Rights Online Digital Gender Gap Audit. Washington D.C.: World Wide Web Foundation. https://webfoundation.org/research/digital-gender-gap-audit/ (accessed 2020-12-03).

World Bank (2018): Gabon: leading ICT-connected country in Central and Western. Africa thanks to judicious investments. Washington, D.C.: World Bank. Retrieved on March 20, 2019, from https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2018/06/25/gabon-leading-ict-connected-country-in-central-and-western-africa-thanks-to-judicious-investments  (accessed 2020-12-07).

Planned Studies:

Library needs in Monrovia, Liberia (2021)

Development of an approach to quantify the socio-economic impact of public libraries for children and young people on GNP (2021)

The economic costs of inadequate education in LDCs projected to 2070 (2021)

Research bei Seeds of Education

Wir arbeiten evidenzbasiert und stützen unsere Entscheidungen auf primäre oder sekundäre Daten.

Bibliotheken und ihre globale Bedeutung

Auf dieser Seite finden Sie Auszüge des Literature Review, das das theoretische Fundament für unsere Inter­vention bildet. 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Globale Situation und Ausblick

Für den Erwerb, die Entwicklung und den lebenslangen Gebrauch der eigenen In Lese- und Schreibfähigkeiten sind dynamische und anregende Lese- und Schreibumgebungen essenziell. In Regionen, in denen ein gravierender Mangel an einem Zugang zu Lesematerialien herrscht, ist ohne dessen Behebung ein solcher lebenslanger Gebrauch sowie eine lebendige Lesekultur im gesellschaftlichen Querschnitt kaum zu erreichen (vgl. Krolak 2005: 3).  

Als besonders junger Kontinent mit dem größten Anteil junger Menschen an der durchschnittlichen Demografie, hat Afrika im letzten Jahrzehnt ein hohes, aber nicht gänzlich inklusives Wirtschaftswachstum erlebt. Der Kontinent hat noch immer mit der höchsten Analphabetenrate sowie einer hohen Arbeitslosigkeit, vor allem unter Jugendlichen, zu kämpfen (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 2). Analphabetismus und kein ausreichender Zugang zu freier Bildung sind aber keineswegs ein afrikanisches Problem, sondern lassen sich global vor allem in wirtschaftlich schwächeren Regionen beobachten. 

Auch der Digital Divide spielt eine Rolle: Mädchen und Frauen haben in wirtschaftlich schwächeren Regionen meist keinen gleichberechtigen Zugang zu Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie sowie darauf fokussierte Schulungen oder Bildungsangebote. Öffentliche Bibliotheken können sowohl den Zugang als auch das nötige Training zur Verfügung stellen (vgl. IFLA: 2015). 

Global gibt es nach wie vor große Unterschiede bezüglich Analphetisierungsgraden, dem freien Zugang zu Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie sowie einer anregenden und dynamischen Lese- und Schreibumgebung. Bibliotheken als bekanntes Konzept stellen eine vielversprechende Möglichkeit dar, diese Unterschiede im freien Zugang zu Wissen und Bildung zu überwinden.

 

Die Bibliothek als Begleiterin schulischer Bildung

Qualitativ hochwertige Bildung ist also essentiell um breites Wissen innerhalb einer Bevölkerung zu ermöglichen. Bildungsressourcen sind entscheidend für die Verbesserung des Bildungsniveaus in den Schulen (vgl. Mojapelo 2017: 3). Bibliotheken bieten Ihren Nutzer*Innen Zugang zu Lesematerialien, sowie Alphabetisierungsprogrammen, welche langfristig die schulischen Leistungen der Schüler*Innen verbessern. Außerdem werden non-formale Bildungsaktivitäten, wie Veranstaltungen und Wettbewerbe gefördert (vgl. Dent & Yannotta 2005, in Omona 2020: 7).

Die UNESCO fordert in ihrem Framework zur Erreichung des SDG 4 eine Sicherstellung des Zugangs zu freier und nachhaltiger Bildung  für Kinder und Jugendliche, sowie den Zugang zu sicheren Orten für einen solchen Bildungserwerb (UNESCO 2015: 35-51). 

So wie Alphabetisierung ein funktionales Framework benötigt, müssen neu erworbene Lese- und Schreibfähigkeiten ständig genutzt und verbessert werden, um eine dauerhafte Alphabetisierung sicher zu stellen. Dabei spielen zwar verschiedene Bereiche eine Rolle, etwa die Schulsituation und die häusliche Umgebung, doch auch Bibliotheken können einen Einfluss nehmen (vgl. Krolak 2005: 2; vgl. Singh 2003: viii), etwa durch die Förderung am Lesespaß (vgl. Omona 2020: 7). Kinder, die in einem alphabetisierten häuslichen Umfeld aufwachsen, sind bei der Einschulung im Vorteil und haben eine höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit, während der gesamten formalen Schulzeit erfolgreicher zu sein als ihre Altersgenossen aus einem nicht- oder halbalphabetisierten häuslichen Umfeld (vgl. Stiftung Lesen 2004: 30).

Der Wunsch, den Schriftspracherwerb der eigenen Kinder zu unterstützen, ist für erwachsene Analphabeten eine starke Motivation, selbst lesen und schreiben zu lernen. Diese Gruppe kann von Bibliotheken gezielt durch familiäre Alphabetisierungsprogramme erreicht werden, von denen folglich sowohl Eltern als auch Kinder profitieren (vgl. Krolak 2005: 4f.). 

Vor allem durch die Kooperation mit lokalen Schulen  bezüglich Aktivitäten und Ressourcen können gut ausgestattete, funktionale Gemeindebibliotheken  eine zentrale Rolle bei der Förderung von guter Bildung spielen (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 12). Auch die Aufklärung über Grundrechte kann in Bibliotheken erfolgen, um so geschlechtsspezifische Ungleichheiten zu bekämpfen. Mit innovativen und gut konzipierten Programmen können Gemeindebibliotheken vor allem Mädchen dabei unterstützen, sie für Politik, Wirtschaft und Führungspositionen zu begeistern/sensibilisieren (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 13).

Bibliotheken sind ein möglicher Faktor in der Festigung der schulischen Bildung einnehmen. Durch die Möglichkeit, auch Eltern und Mitglieder der Gemeinden generell in bildenden Aktivitäten (Workshops, etc.) einzubinden, können sie zudem auch weitere entscheidende Faktoren, wie den Umgang mit Bildung in der häuslichen Umgebung, mit beeinflussen. Zudem können sie Gleichberechtigung durch gezielte Initiativen fördern.

Positiver Einfluss außerschulischen Lesens

Studien belegen den positiven Einfluss des zusätzlichen Zugangs zu Büchern und Lesematerialien: 

Eine Studie des READ Educational Trust in Südafrika, verglich Kinder in Klassen mit Klassenbibliotheken mit einer Kontrollgruppe ohne Bibliotheken. Kinder mit Klassenbibliothek schnitten um bis zu 189 Prozent besser abschnitten als die Schüler der Kontrollschule und waren in den Leseleistungen um 18 Monate und in den Schreibleistungen um zwei Jahre voraus (vgl. Montagnes 2001: 28).

Auch sog. “Book Floods” zeigen enorme Verbesserungen im Lesen, Schreiben, Zuhören, Vokabular und in der Grammatik (vgl. Krolak 2005: 6).

Der frühe Zugang zu Büchern fördert Bildung, wie das Programm “Bookstart” in Großbritannien herausfand – die Übertragung des Ergebnisses auf Orte mit geringeren Dichte an Angeboten zum freien Informationserwerb, etwa Afrika südlich der Sahara, lässt auf vergleichbare Ergebnisse hoffen (vgl. Makotsi 2004: 5).

Verschiedene Ansätze zeigen, dass der außerschulische Zugang zu Lesematerialien die individuelle Bildung eines Kindes positiv beeinflusst. Bibliotheken, als für alle Gesellschaftsschichten frei verfügbare Sammlungen von Lesematerialien, können diese Erkenntnis nutzen, um Kindern und Jugendlichen eine bessere Bildung zu ermöglichen und Interesse am Lesen, Schreiben und Literatur zu wecken.

 

Sozioökonomische Bedeutung

Um an nachhaltigen Veränderungen beitragen zu können, benötigen Individuen Fähigkeiten, Werte und Einstellungen die sie dazu befähigen. Bildung ist daher entscheidend für das Erreichen einer nachhaltigen Entwicklung.

Laut Abata-Ebire (2018) und Bradley (2016) unterstützen Bibliotheken die Arbeit an der Erreichung der Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) wesentlich, indem sie den Zugang zu Informationen und Informationstechnologie ermöglichen und Menschen bei der Entwicklung der Fähigkeit zur effektiven Nutzung von Informationen und deren Bewahrung zur Sicherstellung des kontinuierlichen Zugangs für zukünftige Generationen unterstützen.

Effektive Bibliotheks- und Informationsdienste fördern die sozioökonomische Entwicklung, indem sie eine Wissensgesellschaft fördern und Menschen, insbesondere marginalisierte und in Armut lebende Menschen, in die Lage versetzen, ihre Rechte wahrzunehmen, wirtschaftlich aktiv zu sein, neue Fähigkeiten zu erlernen, die kulturelle Identität zu bereichern und an der Entscheidungsfindung teilzunehmen (vgl. IFLA 2013, nach Omona 2020: 2).

Bibliotheken können in Ländern des globalen Südens wichtige Orte des Informations- und Wissensaustauschs sein, vor allem in marginalisierten Gruppen, in denen Menschen mit geringer oder keiner formalen Bildung aufwachsen, die von Geschlechterungleichheiten geprägt sind und von extremer Armut bedroht sind. 

Bibliotheken bieten einen neutralen Raum, in dem sich Frauen sicher versammeln und unabhängig oder kollektiv in Bereichen lernen können, die für sie relevant und von Interesse sind, um ihre Kompetenzen und Fähigkeiten zu verbessern und so die Gleichstellung der Geschlechter und die Stärkung der Frauen zu erreichen (vgl. Jones 2009: 126 in Omona 2020: 12).

Zahlreiche Forscher*Innen haben sich mit der Förderung der persönlichen und gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Bürger im Kontext von öffentlich zugänglichen Bibliotheken beschäftigt. Da der Zugang zu Informationen ein Menschenrecht ist, kann die Bedeutung von Bibliotheken nicht hoch genug eingeschätzt werden. Die Schaffung solcher Orte bedient dieses Menschenrecht und fördert den gleichberechtigten Zugang unabhängig vom sozioökonomischen Hintergrund, dem Geschlecht oder des Glaubens (vgl. The IFLA/UNESCO xPublic Library Manifesto 1994; vgl. Salman et al. 2017; vgl. South African Bill of Rights 2011; vgl. Fourie & Meyer 2016; vgl. Jain & Nfila 2011; vgl. Stilwell 2016).

Strukturelle Benachteiligung und extreme Armut haben große Auswirkungen auf die Qualität der Lerninhalte, die angeboten werden. Zugang zu Informationen sind ein wesentlicher Bestandteil sozioökonomischer Entwicklung. Mojapelo empfiehlt daher, dass öffentliche Bibliotheken ihre Rollen, Ressourcen und Dienstleistungen verändern und neu denken müssen. Diese müssen angepasst, neu konfiguriert und erweitert werden um die SDGs erreichen zu können, in denen sie den Nutzer*Innen Informationen und einen guten Zugang zur Verfügung stellen (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 14).

Bibliotheken sind sichere, einladende Orte im Herzen von Gemeinden. Ausgestattet mit einem einladenden Team, dass die lokalen Bedürfnisse genau kennt, sind sie in der Lage, Innovationen, Kreativität und den Zugang zum Wissen der Welt für heutige und zukünftige Generationen zu fördern und bereitzustellen (vgl. IFLA 2018).

Bekannte Fehlerquellen im internationalen Bibliotheksaufbau

Lor, der sich tiefgehend mit Konzepten und Methoden des internationalen Bibliothekswesens auseinandergesetzt hat (vgl. 2015; vgl. 2019) schlägt vor, von den vielen Möglichkeiten, sich bei neuem zu orientieren, vor allem die gescheiterten Versuche zu beachten, da diese aufschlussreicher sein können als solche, die erfolgreich waren (vgl. Lor 2015: 531). Es folgt ein Auszug unserer Recherche zu bekannten Fehlerquellen: 

Ein nicht lokalisiertes Bibliothekswesen:
Das angloamerikanische Modell der Bibliothek ist weit verbreitet und prägt die Ausbildung vieler Bibliothekare auf dem ganzen Planeten. Der dadurch bedingte Export eines auf westliche Leser zugeschnittenen Bibliothekswesens ist jedoch gerade aus postkolonialer Sicht kritikwürdig, so Krolak (vgl. Krolak 2005: 11). Die Autorin empfiehlt stattdessen eine lokal-individualisierte Variante – so, wie es auch Seeds of Education durch seine Qualität als lernende Organisation anstrebt.

Unterschiedliche und extreme Wetterbedingungen:
Da Bücher, Computer und audiovisuelle Materialien sehr empfindlich sind, müssen sie vor extremen Witterungsbedingungen geschützt werden. In unserem Projektplan werden diese Aspekte berücksichtigt, so dass Regen und Feuchtigkeit oder Sonne und Hitze keine Hindernisse darstellen (vgl. ebd).

Diese und weitere bekannte Fehlerquellen fließen mit in unseren Ansatz ein. Als lernende Organisation wachsen wir stetig an dem Feedback aller Beteiligten und unserer Nutzer und lernen auch aus eigenen Fehlern.

Bibliotheken und Informationszugang

Informationen können einen großen Beitrag zur sozialen und demokratischen Entwicklung, zur kulturellen Bereicherung, zu Bildung und Forschung, zur mikro- und makroökonomischen Entwicklung leisten (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 2).

Der Zugang zu Informationen unterstützt die Entwicklung, indem er Menschen, insbesondere Randgruppen und Menschen, die in Armut leben, befähigt, ihre Rechte wahrzunehmen, wirtschaftlich aktiv zu sein, neue Fähigkeiten zu erlernen, ihre kulturelle Identität zu bereichern und an Entscheidungsprozessen teilzunehmen (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 7).

Die Qualität der angebotenen Bildung kann nur verbessert werden, indem angemessene Inputs in Form von adäquaten Bildungsressourcen, qualifiziertem Lehrpersonal und modernen Einrichtungen gegeben werden (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 11).

Ohne angemessene Inputs in Form von adäquaten Bildungsressourcen, qualifizierten und kompetenten Lehrern und modernen Einrichtungen bleibt es für viele (ländliche) Schulen ein Traum, die Qualität der angebotenen Bildung zu verbessern (vgl. Mojapelo 2018: 11).

Darüber hinaus werden Informationen für Empowerment und Decision-Making benötigt und sind für die Entwicklung in ländlichen Gemeinden notwendig (vgl. Unagha & Ibenne, 2011). Gerade in ländlichen Regionen besteht ein großer Bedarf an Informationsdiensten, welche die BürgerInnen ausreichend versorgt (vgl. Omona 2020: 4).

Der gleichberechtigten Zugang zu Informationen ist unerlässlich, um die Teilnahme an einer demokratischen, globalen Gemeinschaft zu befähigen (vgl. Krolak 2005: 7). Bibliotheken entfalten das Lernpotenzial einer Gemeinschaft, indem sie diese zur Verfügung stellen.

Gerade in einer globalisierten Welt ist der Zugang zu Informationen unerlässlich. Bibliotheken genießen innerhalb Gesellschaften einen sehr hohen Stellenwert und versorgen Menschen mit wichtigen Neuigkeiten und qualitativ hochwertigen Inhalten. 

Angedachte Studien

Bibliotheksbedarf in Monrovia, Liberia (2021)

Erarbeitung eines Ansatzes zur Quantifizierung des sozioökonomischen Einflusses von öffentlichen Bibliotheken für Kinder und Jugendliche auf das BNP (2021)

Die volkswirtschaftlichen Kosten unzureichender Bildung in LDCs projiziert bis 2070 (2021)

Literatur

Abu, R.; Grace M.; Carroll M. (2011): The role of the rural public library in community development and empowerment. International Journal of the Book 8(2). Available at: https://codeethiopiadigitalbooks.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/rolecommunitylibrary.pdf accessed 2021-01-12).

Cyr, C;  Connaway, LS. (2020): Libraries and the UN Sustainable Development Goals: The past, present, and future. Proc Assoc Inf Sci Technol. 57:e237. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1002/pra2.237 (accessed 2021-01-24).

Dent, V.F. (2006): Modelling the rural community library: Characteristics of the Kitengesa Library in rural Uganda. New Library World 107(1220/1221): 16–30.

IFLA (2012): Empowering Women and Girls through ICT at Libraries Issue Brief, October 2012. The Hague: Beyond Access.

Jones, S. (2009): The community library as site of education and empowerment for women. Insights from rural Uganda. Libri, 59(2), 124-133.

Krolak, L. (2005): The role of libraries in the creation of literate environments. Background paper prepared for the Education For All Global Maintaining Report 2006 Literacy for Life. UNESCO Institute for Education, Hamburg, Germany.

Lor, P. J. (2015): Understanding innovation and policy transfer: implications for Libraries and Information Services in Africa. Library Trends, 64(1), 84-111.

Lor, P. J. (2019): International and comparative librarianship: concepts and methods for global studies. Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG.

Mchombu, K. & Cadbury, N. (2006): Libraries, literacy and poverty reduction: A key to African development. Available at: http://eprints.rclis.org/10167/1/2006.MchombuK%26CadburyN.LibrariesPoverty.pdf (accessed 2021-02-03).

McKee, B. (n.d.): The role of the library in promoting peace. Available at: http://www.un.org/depts/dhl/dag/symposium_docs/mckee.pdf (accessed 2021-01-30).

Mansour, E. (2019): Libraries as agents for development: The potential role of Egyptian rural public libraries towards the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals based on the UN 2030 Agenda. Available at: 
https://doi.org/10.1177/0961000619872064 (accessed 2021-01-14).

Omona, W. (2020): The roles of library and information services in achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Uganda. Library Philosophy and Practice, 1-19.

Poon, L. (2019): Should Libraries be Guardians of their Cities’ Public Data? CityLab. https://www.citylab.com/life/2019/02/libraries-public-information-city-data-digital-archive/581905/ (accessed 2020-12-12).

Scarf, P. (2016): Free, online and in your public library: delivering legal information to the community. Presented at the 2016 World Library and Information Congress, Columbus, United States. http://library.ifla.org/1373/1/179-scarf-en.pdf  (accessed 2020-12-06).

Scherer, J.A. (2014): Green libraries promoting sustainable communities. In: WLIC 2014 at Session 152: Environmental Sustainability and Libraries Special Interest Group, Lyon, France, 16–22 August 2014. IFLA. Available at:
http://library.ifla.org/939/1/152-scherer-en.pdf 
(accessed 2021-02-02).

Singh, S. (2003): Library and literacy movement for national development. New Delhi, Concept Publishing. xxvi, 286 p. Bibl.: pp. 269-280.

Stranger-Johannessen, E.; Asselin, M.; Doiron, R. (2015): New perspectives on community library development in Africa”, New Library World, Vol. 116 Iss 1/2 pp. 79 – 93. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/NLW-05-2014-0063 (accessed 2021-02-03).

United Nations (2015): Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform. Available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300 (accessed 2021-02-01).

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (2016): Education for people & planet: Creating sustainable futures for all. Paris: UNESCO. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000250392 (accessed 2020-12-03).

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (2017): Reducing global poverty through universal primary and secondary education. Policy Paper 32/Fact Sheet 44. Paris: UNESCO. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000250392  (accessed 2020-12-03).

United Nations (2017): Sustainable Development Goals: 17 Goals to transform our world. Available at: http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment (accessed 2021-01-15).

Web Foundation (2016): Women’s Rights Online Digital Gender Gap Audit. Washington D.C.: World Wide Web Foundation. https://webfoundation.org/research/digital-gender-gap-audit/ (accessed 2020-12-03).

World Bank (2018): Gabon: leading ICT-connected country in Central and Western. Africa thanks to judicious investments. Washington, D.C.: World Bank. Retrieved on March 20, 2019, from https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2018/06/25/gabon-leading-ict-connected-country-in-central-and-western-africa-thanks-to-judicious-investments  (accessed 2020-12-07).